New Youtube Channel for a new time

I’ve decided to start a new Youtube channel simply because I feel as though adding my projects and the things that I like to a video channel will drive me in ways I hadn’t had before. Thus far, I have 0 subscribers (aside from myself) and I’m genuinely curious to see how well I can make a Youtube channel work out. I believe I have some interesting things to share and some boring but popular things to share as well and a new Youtube channel that explores all those things.

Here’s a link to the channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwxvlEKdkh9eV9qLXHBh3fw

Not the most graceful URL but I will get a better one once I get some subscribers and I’ve been around for a while. I will explore things that I do such as electronics, gaming, machining, photography and whatever else I come across.

Here’s a video detailing something mundane, my calculator collection.

So, feel free to look at my channel, subscribe and like a video or two. 🙂

Diminutive, a small EDM prototype

For the last little bit I’ve been working on a small EDM prototype for use on large parts, pipe sections or for use in the field. While they do make and sell these things, the vast majority of them require the use of vibratory assistance, aren’t terribly accurate and are relatively low powered. I intend to make one that is accurate and could potentially be used as a ram EDM in a pinch. Also, I’d like it to be able to use copper and graphite electrodes so polarity reversal is necessary.

This is the linear drive of the small EDM. It has 8 inches of travel and is surprisingly rigid and play-free. I was going to use a gear motor on the top with a rotary encoder but since the loads are quite small a stepper should be OK, even at higher speeds.
This is the linear drive of the small EDM. It has 8 inches of travel and is surprisingly rigid and play-free. I was going to use a gear motor on the top with a rotary encoder but since the loads are quite small a stepper should be OK, even at higher speeds.

I’m currently trying to come up with ways to mount this guy on magnetic bases but also allow for small amounts of fine adjustment so that if there is a need for precision work, the unit can be dialed in. Right now the coupling is made of two pieces of steel. I’m going to replace one of them with nylon to reduce noise. I was going to use a spider coupler with rubber in between but I didn’t have one kicking around on the weekend when I was making it so I just made my own.

It's all made from 7075 aircraft aluminum. Pretty strong stuff. The movement was initially pretty stiff because the screw, which is just hot rolled, was a little bit out so I had to run it back and forth to wear in the brass acme nut. I may put two acme nuts into the travel block simply to take up play, as it stands though right now there is less tan .0003" of play, even with significant force applied.
It’s all made from 7075 aircraft aluminum. Pretty strong stuff. The movement was initially pretty stiff because the screw, which is just hot rolled, was a little bit out so I had to run it back and forth to wear in the brass acme nut. I may put two acme nuts into the travel block simply to take up play, as it stands though right now there is less tan .0003″ of play, even with significant force applied.

So next things next, the prototype electronics. Right now I’m simply going to use what I have laying around, so a TM1638 display, a cheap chinese stepper driver with a toshiba stepper driver and I opted for an Arduino to drive the motor. I will be making a full fledged PCB that will nicely fit in a box but I need to get the pulse generator and sensory circuits working first, then I can integrate them fully on to one PCB.

Just a rough testbed for the motion control and a simple interface. I would like this thing to be nice and easy to use.
Just a rough testbed for the motion control and a simple interface. I would like this thing to be nice and easy to use.

Well, anyways, I have quite a bit more work to do for this project. Even a single axis CNC can be a little more tricky since it’s doing more than simply positioning. A ram EDM is a dynamic machine that reacts to the sensory input to keep the cut running smoothly and with appropriate voltage and gap settings.

More later.

Three years at Rejent!

Well, It’s been three years at Rejent (plus a week). Since I haven’t updated in a while I figured I’d go through some of my Solidworks files and post a few of the things I’ve worked on during my time here. After looking through the files I am quite amazed at how freakin’ many parts I’ve worked on over the time I’ve been here. Hundreds of different things!

Anyways, here are some pics of a few things I’ve worked on during my time here, albeit a very limited selection of them.

That was just a few of them that I randomly found, nothing too crazy since some of I couldn’t really show. Well, let’s see what the next few years brings.

The project is finished! And other goings on.

I have just finished the project that has taken up the last 3 months. Delivered to the customer and they are very happy with it.

A view from above on the two sizes we made for the customer.
A view from above on the two sizes we made for the customer.

I’m so glad to be done this project. While it wasn’t a terribly long project, I’m glad it all went off without any real problems. It measures better than they’d hoped and it’s a pretty attractive little package, for what it is. Next iterations will be significantly smaller and I will look at new encoders to use.

Also, as an aside I have set up my new office. It’s nice to get out of the basement. I now have a lot of free room now so it’s nice to spread out and be able to sort through all my shit and set it up as efficiently (for me) as possible.

This is my new office for 2013. I have a new computer coming soon.
This is my new office for 2013. I have a new computer coming soon.

Final version of Digital Gage almost done!

This device is almost complete. Yes, It’s missing its buttons but the device seems to work well and nice and smooth. The real anvils are almost done and the device will ship to our customer fairly soon and I’m glad to see these guys be done!

DigiGage top Digigage from the right Digigage from the top panelThere are still some tweaks to make especially in the realm of overall rigidity but overall it’ll be a neat device to attempt to bring to market in different ways.

 

The Electrolytic Deburring Machine

Something I haven’t worked on in a while but is coming up is my new electrolytic deburring machine. I figured I’d post a couple of pictures for posterity.

In it’s current state, it does work to a degree. I need to work on the chemistry of the fluid. Right now it seems to just pit the material. Perhaps the voltage is too low or too high but I suspect it’s purely a lack of conductivity or the incorrect chemistry for this type application.

Eventually we should be able to deburr cutters and various other items. Just thought I’d share.

The Mitutoyo AT715 and me

It’s been a while since I’ve posted and that’s primarily because I’ve been working on a project. I have to keep some of the details to myself but I will show some pictures of the prototype that has taken me a couple of weeks to design and build.

The precursor to my project, the Ultigage.
The precursor to my project, the Ultigage.

The device uses the AT715 from Mitutoyo and what an interesting device it is. With a resolution of .0005mm and an RS485 interface, it is an ideal device for measurement and for use on machines. The device, which uses magnetic induction, uses 30ma whereas a lot of other glass scales use up to 250ma @ 5v. This is a pretty cool device.

The prototype board for this device
The prototype board for this device

Well, I can’t get into a great deal of detail because the product I have in mind may compete with other gaging companies like Gagemaker with a universal, handheld, high precision, digital gage that has active, rugged and dynamic probes. The images shown are that of a rough prototype, I’m not normally secretive but once one is built in a few weeks I can post some images of the more refined version.

After all, this is simply a post for posterity. 🙂

A look at Rejent Tool in 2013

Well things are proceeding apace in the shop these days. Over the last two years we’ve been pushing ahead and growing the shop in terms of equipment and technology.

I have a couple of photo’s, taken from the same spot over a difference of a little over 2 years.

A look at rejent too in November 2010
A look at rejent too in November 2010. a little empty looking.
A look at Rejent in February 2013
A look at Rejent in February 2013. A Bit messy since the machine on the right has just been moved in.

You can see that the shop is much fuller and has much different machines in it. We’ll see what the next couple of years brings, perhaps a new shop?!?

A Simple Die

Just posting some images of a die I made. It came in for servicing and so I decided it’s be prudent to post some images of it for posterity.

A broad view of the simple die, it just simple accepts conduit and punches a couple of slotted holes in it. nothing special.
A broad view of the simple die, it just simple accepts conduit and punches a couple of slotted holes in it. nothing special.
A closer view of the die. As you can see, the punches and dies are both insertable. Since the material it punches is quite thick, the gap is quite large, like .006"
A closer view of the die. As you can see, the punches and dies are both insertable. Since the material it punches is quite thick, the gap is quite large, like .006″

Anyways, nothing too special but I figured I’d keep it here for posterity.

Building a quadrature generator with a PIC10F222

I need to start my new project with my digital RTJ gage and in order to do so I need to use the quadrature decoder chip LS7166. I could use the actual encoder I’m going to use for the project but it is large and unwieldy so I decided to build a generator for it.

The concept is simple, have a knob that produces no waveform in the middle of it’s stroke and as the pot deviates from the center, the speed of the signal increases also changing direction based on which side the knob id turned to. I couldn’t use a PIC10F200 much to my chagrin because it doesn’t have an ADC module built in, the PIC10F222 does however. It still works within my concept of low-end mcu’s doing valuable jobs since they’re still only 55 cents in quantity, from digikey of all places.

Overall, it’s a pretty simple design.

  • GP3 -> unconnected
  • GP2 -> Channel B out (Digital output)
  • GP1 -> Channel A out (Digital output)
  • GP0 -> 10k Potentiometer in (Analog in)

Dead simple. I did program a bit of a dead spot in the middle so that one can stop the quadrature from advancing quite easily. I put 2 LEDs on it to indicate that it is in fact working. Anyways, here’s the source (again it’s in Oshonsoft BASIC)

10f222 quadrature src.zip

I didn’t bother drawing up a circuit diagram since it’s such an easy circuit but here’s an additional image if you’re really curious. keep in mind that the board I’m using is Stripboard (aka Veroboard) so the traces run along one direction

Now for the fun challenge of making a simple serial interface MCU to the LS7166.